How to Buy a Used Car - Save Yourself a Ton of Cash on Your Next Car!

Are you in the market for a used vehicle and you are not sure what your options are or which auction is the best? There are many different ways to learn how to buy a used car, but there are only a few options that will actually make sense to you. Here are your best options depending on your situation.
First, if you are looking to finance a vehicle because you do not have a lot of cash to put down, then you have a couple of basic options. If you know you have bad credit, then you better start going to the buy here pay here dealers because they will be about the only ones that can help.

If you have good credit, then you have the option of any dealer out there. You can also buy from a private party and finance the vehicle through your bank or another lender.
Second, if you want to buy a car and save yourself a little bit of money, then your best bet is to save up enough cash to purchase the vehicle for cash. When you learn how to buy a used car you will know that if you purchase a car for cash you will be able to negotiate a better price. Plus you will not have to pay any finance charges or interest on the vehicle.

Last, if you have the cash to buy with cash, then learning how to buy a used car from an auto auction is a great option. This will allow you to get about twice the car for the price. You will basically be eliminating the middle man, his profit, and the mark up you would pay at a used car lot for the same vehicle you can find at the auto auction in your area.

Click Here and gain access to the Largest Database of Government Seized Car Auctions on the Internet!

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How To Buy A Used Car - Get The Best Used Car For Your Money

Knowing how to buy a used car is not difficult. You don't need to know a lot about cars and what makes a car work. What you do need to know are some common sense tips that will help you avoid buying some other person's problem.

I sold cars for 8 years and I can tell you that not every salesman is a rip-off artist. There are people out there who you can trust to help you get the most for your used car dollar. Through selling cars myself, I have learned invaluable lessons that have helped me to know how to purchase any used product and what to look for to make sure that I don't get ripped off.
Here are a few common sense tips to help you make a good buying decision when looking for the right car to spend your hard-earned money on.

1. Decide what make and models you will be happy with, before you go to the dealer.
One of the best places to begin your research about used cars is at consumer sites like J.D. Powers. This site is probably my favorite place to evaluate the reliability ratings of every brand of car sold in America. Here you can find out quickly and reliably which auto manufacturers make the longest lasting cars sold. If you are going to buy used, you want to know the track record of the make and model you are considering. There is no better place than J.D. Powers.

2. Know what the fair market value of the car is before you go to buy and know what you are willing to spend.
The internet has made it so easy to evaluate car values in today's market. Do your homework online at Auto Trader and also on Kelly Blue Book. These are 2 incredibly accurate resources for determining the value of used cars. On Auto Trader, do a 200 mile radius search for the model you are interested in. Then go to the bottom of that page and you will see the highest price, lowest price, and the average price that car is being sold for. Tremendous information. This gives you great ammunition when you are ready to negotiate the price of the right car.

3. Shop by referral only.
Ask your friends for referrals. They will give them to you if they have had a good experience somewhere. If you can't find anyone to give you a referral, then call the dealership. Ask the receptionist who she would send her best friend to at the dealership to buy a car. If that doesn't work, ask for a manager and tell him you only want to work with him or at the very least his most highly recommended sales person. If he is a good manager he will make sure you get treated well and he will spare you the runaround that so many people get at a dealership.
These 3 things alone will make you a more sophisticated car shopper than 95% of the people walking onto a car lot to buy a car. Good luck and hopefully you know more than you did before about how to buy a used car.


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Real Estate Developers at a Glance

A 'real estate investor', who can be also called as 'real estate developer' is a business person who buys and sells properties like land and houses. He is the person between the seller and the buyer. In countries like United Kingdom, a real estate developer is also called a 'real estate broker'. A real estate investor meets many financial and business choices everyday, like capital gains, tax credits and interest rates. For this he needs to have a deep knowledge on real estate investing, he should also be capable of understanding things and a hard worker. A real estate investor gets his knowledge only through years of experience in real estate investing; he also needs to have deep interest and dedicated. He should to be patient while dealing with his clients and ready to wake up at 2:00AM to speak over the phone!


A real estate investors or brokers frequently have sales people, who are also called as 'agents', who help and assist real estate investors in the process of selling properties and even carries out other legal activities, refers legal documents and supervise things. To work as a real estate investor, the investor needs a license as the money is been exchanged between parties and the broker needs to be in presence as the agents work. Real estate investors without license will not be allowed to work unless the property buyer is working with his real estate developer. In this case, there is no necessity of any paperwork. Initially you need to be accredited as a real estate investor to obtain a license which is followed by a mandatory ninety hour course and you have to pass the real estate law exam.

A real estate investor generally targets either residential real estate or the commercial real estate. But there are investors who can handle both. If you need to survive with commercial real estate investing, then you need to have gain lot of experience and knowledge through residential real estate investing. But in many cases the experience which you obtain in residential real estate won't be enough! Investors dealing with commercial real estates must have enough capital and they need to learn more things as they handle rich business people who will be quite analytical and expect better things from you. Compared to residential, commercial real estate investing is known to be more rewarding and challenging.
Jeff Adams is a SEO copywriter for real estate millionaire code. He has written many articles in various topics. For more information about Jeff Adams and Jeff Adams real estate. Visit our site real estate millionaire. Contact him at realestatemillionaire.info@gmail.com

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Top 7 Mistakes Rookie Real Estate Agents Make

Every time I talk to someone about my business and career, it always comes up that "they've thought about getting into real estate" or know someone who has.
With so many people thinking about getting into real estate, and getting into real estate - why aren't there more successful Realtors in the world? Well, there's only so much business to go around, so there can only be so many Real Estate Agents in the world. I feel, however, that the inherent nature of the business, and how different it is from traditional careers, makes it difficult for the average person to successfully make the transition into the Real Estate Business. As a Broker, I see many new agents make their way into my office - for an interview, and sometimes to begin their careers. New Real Estate Agents bring a lot of great qualities to the table - lots of energy and ambition - but they also make a lot of common mistakes. Here are the 7 top mistakes rookie Real Estate Agents Make.
 
1) No Business Plan or Business Strategy
So many new agents put all their emphasis on which Real Estate Brokerage they will join when their shiny new license comes in the mail. Why? Because most new Real Estate Agents have never been in business for themselves - they've only worked as employees. They, mistakenly, believe that getting into the Real Estate business is "getting a new job." What they're missing is that they're about to go into business for themselves. If you've ever opened the doors to ANY business, you know that one of the key ingredients is your business plan. Your business plan helps you define where you're going, how you're getting there, and what it's going to take for you to make your real estate business a success. Here are the essentials of any good business plan:
A) Goals - What do you want? Make them clear, concise, measurable, and achievable.
B) Services You Provide - you don't want to be the "jack of all trades & master of none" - choose residential or commercial, buyers/sellers/renters, and what area(s) you want to specialize in. New residential real estate agents tend to have the most success with buyers/renters and then move on to listing homes after they've completed a few transactions.
C) Market - who are you marketing yourself to?
D) Budget - consider yourself "new real estate agent, inc." and write down EVERY expense that you have - gas, groceries, cell phone, etc... Then write down the new expenses you're taking on - board dues, increased gas, increased cell usage, marketing (very important), etc...
E) Funding - how are you going to pay for your budget w/ no income for the first (at least) 60 days? With the goals you've set for yourself, when will you break even?
F) Marketing Plan - how are you going to get the word out about your services? The MOST effective way to market yourself is to your own sphere of influence (people you know). Make sure you do so effectively and systematically.

2) Not Using the Best Possible Closing Team
They say the greatest businesspeople surround themselves with people that are smarter than themselves. It takes a pretty big team to close a transaction - Buyer's Agent, Listing Agent, Lender, Insurance Agent, Title Officer, Inspector, Appraiser, and sometimes more! As a Real Estate Agent, you are in the position to refer your client to whoever you choose, and you should make sure that anyone you refer in will be an asset to the transaction, not someone who will bring you more headache. And the closing team you refer in, or "put your name to," are there to make you shine! When they perform well, you get to take part of the credit because you referred them into the transaction.
The deadliest duo out there is the New Real Estate Agent & New Mortgage Broker. They get together and decide that, through their combined marketing efforts, they can take over the world! They're both focusing on the right part of their business - marketing - but they're doing each other no favors by choosing to give each other business. If you refer in a bad insurance agent, it might cause a minor hiccup in the transaction - you make a simple phone call and a new agent can bind the property in less than an hour. However, because it typically takes at least two weeks to close a loan, if you use an inexperienced lender, the result can be disastrous! You may find yourself in a position of "begging for a contract extension," or worse, being denied a contract extension.
A good closing team will typically know more than their role in the transaction. Due to this, you can turn to them with questions, and they will step in (quietly) when they see a potential mistake - because they want to help you, and in return receive more of your business. Using good, experienced players for your closing team will help you infinitely in conducting business worthy of MORE business...and best of all, it's free!

3) Not Arming Themselves with the Necessary Tools
Getting started as a Real Estate Agent is expensive. In Texas, the license alone is an investment that will cost between $700 and $900 (not taking into account the amount of time you'll invest.) However, you'll run into even more expenses when you go to arm yourself with the necessary tools of the trade. And don't fool yourself - they are necessary - because your competitors are definitely using every tool to help THEM.
A) MLS Access is probably the most expensive necessity you're going to run into. Joining your local (and state & national, by default) Board of Realtors will allow you to pay for MLS access, and in Austin, Texas, will run around $1000. However, don't skimp in this area. Getting MLS access is one of the most important things you can do. It's what differentiates us from your average salesman - we don't sell homes, we present any of the homes that we have available. With MLS Access, you will have 99% of the homes for sale in your area available to present to your clients.
B) Mobile Phone w/ a Beefy Plan - These days, everyone has a cell phone. But not everyone has a plan that will facilitate the level of use that Real Estate Agents need. Plan on getting at least 2000 minutes per month. You want, and need, to be available to your clients 24/7 - not just nights and weekends.
C) Computer (Preferably a Laptop) - There's no way around it, you have to have a computer & be savvy enough to use email. You would be wise to invest in some business management software, as well. If you'd like to save some money (and who wouldn't) then you can get the client & email management software Thunderbird from http://www.mozilla.com and you can get a free office suite from http://www.openoffice.org The only downside to these programs is that they do not sync with your PDA or Smart Phone. A Laptop is a BIG plus because you'll be able to work from home or on the go. New Real Estate Agents are often surprised by just how much time they spend AWAY from the office, and a laptop helps you stay on top of your work while on the go.

D) Real Estate Friendly Car - You don't have to have a Lexus, but your Miata won't do the trick. Make sure that you have a 4 door car or SUV that is comfortable and presentable. Keep it clean, and for God's sake, don't smoke in it! You're going to spend a LOT of time in your car, and put a lot of miles on it, so if it's fuel efficient, it's a BIG plus. If you're driving a sporty convertible, or still have your KILLER Jeep from college, it's time to trade it in.

4) Lack of Proper Funding
If you've taken the time to create your business plan, than you should definitely have your budget, but I can't stress enough the importance of having and following your budget. However, the budget alone doesn't address the important aspect of funding. 90% of all small businesses fail due to lack of funding. Typically, new agents will want to have 3 months of reserves in savings before taking the leap into full time agency. However, money in the bank isn't the only way to answer the question of funding. Maybe your partner can support you for a certain period of time. You can keep a part-time job that won't interfere with your business as a Real Estate Agent. Many successful waiters make the transition to successful real estate agents with no money in the bank. When you start your new business, don't expect to earn any income for, at the least, 60 days.

5) Refusing to Spend Money on Marketing
Most new Real Estate Agents don't realize that the hardest part of the business is finding the business. Furthermore, they've just shelled out around $2000 for their license and board dues, so the LAST thing they want to do is to spend more money! Again, the problem lies in the lack of understanding that you've just jumped into the Real Estate Business, you haven't taken a new job. And any good businessperson will tell you that how much business you GET is directly correlative to how much you SPEND on marketing. If you choose the right brokerage, then you will get some good inbound leads. However, don't neglect a good, personal marketing campaign from the beginning to get your own name out as the Real Estate Agent to go to.

6) Not Focusing Their Marketing Efforts in the Most Effective Areas
One reason why many new Real Estate Agents who do begin spending money on personal marketing stop is because they spend it in the wrong place. The easiest place, and where conventional Real Estate tells you to spend your money, is in conventional print marketing - the newspaper, real estate magazines, etc... This is the most visible place to see real estate advertising, it's where large offices spend a good part of their money, and so many new agents mistakenly spend their money here. This becomes very frustrating to new agents because of its low return. Large brokerages can afford to spend their money here because they're filling two needs - they're marketing their own properties for sale while creating new buyer traffic for their buyer's agents. New Real Estate Agents should look to their own sphere of influence and referral marketing to see the most effective return on their investment. An agent can spend as little as $100/month marketing to their family, friends, and colleagues and see an incredible return. There are many great referral systems around that all focus on the same premise - that if you consistently market yourself to your sphere of influence as the Real Estate Agent to go to - then you will get more business. The key is to pick a system and to follow that system. You will see results.

7) Choosing the Wrong Brokerage for the Wrong Reasons
New Real Estate Agents choose their new broker for a variety of reasons - they have a good reputation, they offer the most competitive split, the office is close to their house, etc... While these alone aren't bad reasons to choose a broker, they aren't going to do a lot to help you in your success. The #1 reason to choose a broker, and the question to ask is, "What do you offer your new agents." If the answer is, "The most competitive split in town" you should definitely keep looking. Remember, 100% of $0 is still $0. If you're leaning towards the largest broker in town, who has a great reputation, remember this: You're starting a BUSINESS not a JOB. While it might be fantastic to brag to your friends about landing a job at a prestigious company, it's no accomplishment to hang your license on the same wall in the same office as other successful agents.
Your #1 concern when interviewing new Brokers is what they offer you as a new agent. Do they have incoming leads? What does their training program consist of? What's their retention level? What's their average sales price? Do they encourage their agents to promote themselves? A Broker's purpose is to help new agents start successful careers and to help established Agents progress their careers to the next level. As a new agent, concern yourself less with commission split or agency name and more with specific programs and agency standards.

A new career in Real Estate is very exciting. Starting a Real Estate business provides the new Agent with opportunities for limitless potential and freedom. New Agents have a notoriously high failure rate, however, so a new Real Estate career can also be a very scary prospect. However, if you avoid the 7 Top Mistakes Rookie Real Estate Agents Make, then you'll be far ahead of the competition!
Eric Bramlett is the Broker and co-owner of One Source Realty in Austin Texas. He has seen considerable success in real estate, and looks forward to many more years in the business. Eric currently invests, renovates, and develops real estate in the Greater Austin Texas Market. He spends his time working with select clients, helps his new agents get started in their real estate careers, helps his experienced agents progress their careers to the next level, & when he has time…he takes his dogs to the lake. Visit Eric’s Austin Texas Real Estate Guide & visit his Austin Texas Real Estate company’s website. Austin Condos

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New York Real Estate Ownership Guide

This article is designed to be a roadmap for the first time homebuyer or seller. Throughout, I'll guide you through the many steps of purchasing or selling your property and explain to you in the process how to avoid the most common mistakes. You will also learn both the legal and psychological problems often encountered.
For most people, buying (or selling) a home is one of the biggest part of living the "American dream". It's also probably the biggest investments they will ever make. Not surprising then, that many find this experience to be very exciting but also worrisome at the same time. Achieving the final transaction and transfer of funds for the property (referred to as the "closing") can leave many home owners feeling exhausted, even depressed. The same can be said for buyers. However, if the process is done correctly, it can also be both interesting and exciting for everybody involved. The ultimate outcome depends on many factors: time, energy needed to devote to the transaction, thoughtfulness and patience. All these traits are included in the process, and all can have an impact on your bottom line.

That's why preparation is key in any successful transaction. The process, complicated by multiple transactions and waiting periods, can be quite confusing. Real estate transactions require expertise. Those wanting total control of the transaction with a do-it-yourself attitude can make many costly mistakes. So unless buyers and sellers have a solid background in Real Estate, they stand to lose thousands of dollars in any given transaction.

Saving on New York Real Estate Attorney Fees
Trying to save a few extra dollars on legal fees may sound like a nice idea, especially for those with large down payments. But this strategy may backfire. You may end up being penny-wise, but broke in the long run. There are many detailed procedures involved in the purchase process that the vast majority of consumers may overlook.

In one of the biggest purchases of your life, it's simply not the time to "bargain shop". Remember the key criteria: if you can't afford to see the big picture in the transaction you probably aren't ready to close the deal. The amount of legal fees charged should not be the deciding factor in hiring a particular New York Real Estate Lawyer. You retain a New York Real Estate Lawyer because you trust that they will represent your best interest in the transaction. The bottom line is that you want a New York Real Estate Lawyer you can trust, if trust becomes an issue you are well advised to seek another New York Real Estate Lawyer, no matter how low the fees are. For the most part, a New York Real Estate Lawyers aim to satisfy their clients and keep that satisfaction within the legal bounds of the law --all at the same time. The happier their clients, the busier the New York Real Estate Attorney will be with future clients. So it makes common sense as much as it makes dollars sense to retain a New York Real Estate Lawyer who aim is to achieve the client's goal in the real estate transaction.

Real Estate transactions involve use of standard legal language. It is quite understandable then, if a buyer or seller do not understand the terms used in the transaction. First-time homebuyers have the worst experience. That is the reason why it makes sense to hire a New York Real Estate Lawyer who can represent your interest and can help you avoid pitfalls and unnecessary problems.
If not detected prior to closing, once a problem occurs, it can take time and money to correct the situation. An attorney with experience in New York real estate law can help steer a buyer or seller away from costly mistakes.
What kind of home fits my needs?
When buying a home, you have to determine what property will fit your needs. Picking the right kind of property to purchase requires careful planning, organization, and sacrifice. Since most people don't have the time, real estate brokers can be extremely helpful in letting you understand the many issues you might encounter. The questions involved can be overwhelming. What matters need further inquiry? Which homes come with bad neighbors? There are many matters which you need to inquire about when you look at different properties that interests you. However, some issues are common to most real estate purchases. A simple tip is to determine what borough you like to live. If you plan on living in Queens, Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, Manhattan or Long Island, you may want to deal with a broker in that borough.

Coop or Condos?
Cooperatives are the most popular property purchased in New York City. One reason for this is a trend away from expense-ridden properties where foreclosures are common. Another reason for coop popularity is convenience. Deals can be less expensive (about half the price of a condo) and may involve less paperwork in the closing. Less financial stress and fewer headaches might sound good, right? But what most buyers don't know is that when you buy a co-op, you're NOT buying the physical apartment. Actually, you're buying "shares" of a corporation that owns the building which contains the co-op on its land. Also keep in mind that, just like any other company, a co-op has officers such as a president, a vice-president and a treasurer. And just like any other company they're responsible for the well being of the coop. If the coop suffers a financial meltdown, you could lose your apartment investment altogether.
What happens if I do decide to buy a coop?
You receive a stock certificate and a proprietary lease.
The co-op requires that each coop owner pay a "maintenance fee". If you own a condo, you'll be paying a "common charge." Usually, the monthly fee paid by a shareholder is almost double the fee paid by condo owners.

Sometimes a co-op only "owns" the improvements, and some other company or organization owns the land. This form of co-op is not the normal situation, but it does exist. Your New York Real Estate Attorney should be able to assist you in determining if you are purchasing such a property.
Where does the maintenance fee go? How is the money spent?
When an "entity" (i.e. some organization or other company) holds a mortgage of the co-op, the coop corporation must pay a monthly mortgage payment to the bank. The "maintenance fee" charged to coop owners helps the corporation offset this cost. By charging each shareholder a charge per share the "maintenance fee" helps pay the city taxes on the property as a whole and pay for the expenses in maintaining the property (such as the superintendent or doorman) The "common charge" for a condo helps offset the expenses associated with the maintenance of the building. Elevators, painting, cleanliness and any landscaping all require funding not to mention the common areas of the residential unit.
It is important to note that the monthly fee is not fixed. Just like rent, it can be increased. In buying a condo, however, you are buying a portion of the physical building in which the apartment is located. You then own part of the building and will receive a deed to the property that shows that you are the legal owner. The common charges for condos usually tend to be stable. Most co-ops require that a seller receive approval by the board before attempting to sell. Likewise, the buyer must also be approved by the board to make sure that the buyer will be a "responsible" co-op owner. One exception to this situation is when the coop has a special status as being a "sponsor unit". That means that when the building was converted into a co-op, the co-op conversion plans allowed the sponsor of the building to reserve the right to sell unsold shares without board approval. If you are purchasing the co-op from the original sponsor, then most likely you will not need to get board approval. The same applies to subletting the unit. In most cases you'll need permission. In some cases, purchasing the unit from the original sponsor, may entitle you to the same rights and privileges as the sponsor.

Recently after the cost of fuel skyrocketed, many co-ops and condos monthly fees increased. So when buying a coop or condo make sure that you understand the financial future implications. Ask for the financial information before signing on the bottom line.
Should I buy a single or multi-family residence?
One of the most common dilemmas encountered when purchasing a home is whether to buy a "single-family home" or "muti-family home". Common sense dictates that a single-family home will cost you significantly less than a multi-family home, and will appreciate accordingly. What are the advantages? The peace that comes with it is enticing for some. Not having to deal with renting to strangers, and the headaches of hiring (or being) a landlord. However, on the other side of that argument, a multi-family home can be a financial plus: the rental income helps with the monthly mortgage payments and makes ownership less financially stressful.
How can a real estate agents help me?
Normally the first person you may have direct contact with in the purchase or sale of land or residence, is a real estate agent. Most people use them rather than do it themselves. The agent works for his or her supervisor, and they are called "brokers". The kind of relationship you have with the agent can have a major impact on how well you as a buyer or seller, understand the initial process, and transaction. Two important points: Agents can normally provide good advice and suggestions regarding your purchase or sale. Since they're well-educated in both the property markets and their field, they are can give you past performance for a particular property. However, although the agent may seem to work for you, unless expressly contracted for, they normally work for the seller!
What is a Binder? Why is it important?

A binder (otherwise known as an "offer to purchase") is the first document secured by a minimal money deposit. You will normally sign a binder at the moment that you decide to make the seller an offer to purchase. This tells the seller that you are serious about making the purchase. Once the Binder Agreement is executed, the real estate broker or agent will present it to the seller. If accepted, the property will no longer be shown to potential buyers. It is important to note that the binder, unlike a contract of sale, is subject to a time limit. Unless the binder details the money to be refunded, it will be forfeited under most circumstances.
What should I know about the "Contract of Sale"?
The contract of sale is the first formal stage of the buying and selling process. When you have retained a New York Real Estate Lawyer and have made an acceptable offer, at this point in time, you and the seller will sign a contract of sale. The seller's New York Real Estate Attorney will normally draft the contract and then the buyer's New York Real Estate Attorney will review the contract to make sure that you are protected from any future problems (both legal and residential issues).

It's also important to note that when the buyer signs the contract, a "Down Payment" is given to the seller for the seller's New York Real Estate Attorney to hold in a special account called an "Escrow". The seller's New York Real Estate Attorney is required by ethical rules to do so. However, not to worry: the entire amount will of course, be credited to the buyer and applied to the final outstanding balance at "closing."
The biggest mistake a buyer or seller can make is signing a contract of sale before getting adequate legal representation. A contract of sale is an agreement to purchase and sell the property. Once it's signed, it becomes a legal document. If you change your mind and want to change the terms of the agreement or if you want out of the transaction altogether, then you will find yourself in an extremely frustrating legal bind. That's why an experienced New York Real Estate Lawyer is necessary throughout the process, especially at the beginning stages. The contract of sale dictates exactly how the transaction will proceed. It says how payments will be made and collected, and contains all the important details. Tell your New York Real Estate Lawyer every detail which you think is important and essential to you intensions. For example, maybe you are selling another property while simultaneously buying a home. Since the sale of your property is a condition, that condition is a major detail that you should tell your New York Real Estate Lawyer since, the other "party" may have not accepted your offer had they known such a condition.

Another issue that sometimes comes up is the issue of occupancy. Generally a house is sold vacant. However, if you would like to keep the existing tenants, it is a good idea to tell your New York Real Estate Lawyer (assuming it's not a new construction), and that by itself can save you time and hassle in the process of renting the property later on.

As a seller, should I have my home inspected?
Home inspections can sometimes make or break the deal. A New York Real Estate Lawyer can secure a condition in the contract of sale which allows the buyer to refuse to purchase the property if the home inspector determines that the structure is not physically sound. Termite problems or signs of other wood-destroying insects are great reasons for a buyer to opt out of the contract. In such cases the seller usually return the buyer's down payment and everybody walks away from the table. Home inspections are relatively convenient, inexpensive and will save you a lot of time and money.
Finding a New York Real Estate Lawyer?
When looking for legal representation, most importantly, you want a New York Real Estate Attorney whom you feel comfortable with. If you don't feel comfortable with a particular New York Real Estate Attorney, chances are that you will not have a good working relationship.
An experienced New York Real Estate Lawyer, who you feel comfortable with, can be greatly beneficial in explaining and reducing the mystery out of buying or selling real estate in New York. Your New York Real Estate Lawyer can review and prepare the contract of sale, order title insurance, and conduct key parts of the transaction. Making sure the property you are purchasing has no undisclosed liens. If they do exist, your New York Real Estate Lawyer can take care that they will be satisfied prior to the closing.
The last thing you need is to have doubts and questions about your transaction. You want to make sure that after all the documents are signed and notarized, that you understand what just happened and that you are confident that everything was done correctly.

When should I close the deal?
The closing is the climax of the transaction. The buyer's New York Real Estate Attorney is normally the ringmaster who coordinates the time and place of the closing. The closing is where the parties meet to finalize the deal. Normally the parties you will see at the meeting are the seller and their New York Real Estate Attorney, the bank's New York Real Estate Attorney, and the title representative. What occurs at the closing table can be broken down to three major steps:
The bank makes the loan to the buyer and in return the buyer gives the bank an interest in the property (Mortgage)

The buyer turns that loan over to the seller and in turn receives a deed from the seller
The title company makes certain that the seller does indeed own the property they are transferring
Unless there are any serious outstanding issues, the closing can take about 2-3 hours. At this stage, the buyer should have obtained homeowners Insurance prior to the closing. Since not all insurance companies charge the same prices for the replacement value of a house you might want to shop around before the closing.
Lastly, a day or two prior to the closing, it's always a good idea to do a walk though of the property to make sure that it is in the same condition as when you decided to buy it.
Odalis M. Encarnacion is a New York City Real Estate Lawyer in private practice. For more information visit him on the web: http://www.encarnacionlaw.com

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Home Buyers and Sellers Real Estate Glossary

Every business has it's jargon and residential real estate is no exception. Mark Nash author of 1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home shares commonly used terms with home buyers and sellers.
1031 exchange or Starker exchange: The delayed exchange of properties that qualifies for tax purposes as a tax-deferred exchange.
1099: The statement of income reported to the IRS for an independent contractor.
A/I: A contract that is pending with attorney and inspection contingencies.
Accompanied showings: Those showings where the listing agent must accompany an agent and his or her clients when viewing a listing.
Addendum: An addition to; a document.
Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM): A type of mortgage loan whose interest rate is tied to an economic index, which fluctuates with the market. Typical ARM periods are one, three, five, and seven years.
Agent: The licensed real estate salesperson or broker who represents buyers or sellers.
Annual percentage rate (APR): The total costs (interest rate, closing costs, fees, and so on) that are part of a borrower's loan, expressed as a percentage rate of interest. The total costs are amortized over the term of the loan.
Application fees: Fees that mortgage companies charge buyers at the time of written application for a loan; for example, fees for running credit reports of borrowers, property appraisal fees, and lender-specific fees.
Appointments: Those times or time periods an agent shows properties to clients.
Appraisal: A document of opinion of property value at a specific point in time.
Appraised price (AP): The price the third-party relocation company offers (under most contracts) the seller for his or her property. Generally, the average of two or more independent appraisals.
"As-is": A contract or offer clause stating that the seller will not repair or correct any problems with the property. Also used in listings and marketing materials.
Assumable mortgage: One in which the buyer agrees to fulfill the obligations of the existing loan agreement that the seller made with the lender. When assuming a mortgage, a buyer becomes personally liable for the payment of principal and interest. The original mortgagor should receive a written release from the liability when the buyer assumes the original mortgage.
Back on market (BOM): When a property or listing is placed back on the market after being removed from the market recently.
Back-up agent: A licensed agent who works with clients when their agent is unavailable.
Balloon mortgage: A type of mortgage that is generally paid over a short period of time, but is amortized over a longer period of time. The borrower typically pays a combination of principal and interest. At the end of the loan term, the entire unpaid balance must be repaid.
Back-up offer: When an offer is accepted contingent on the fall through or voiding of an accepted first offer on a property.
Bill of sale: Transfers title to personal property in a transaction.
Board of REALTORS® (local): An association of REALTORS® in a specific geographic area.
Broker: A state licensed individual who acts as the agent for the seller or buyer.
Broker of record: The person registered with his or her state licensing authority as the managing broker of a specific real estate sales office.
Broker's market analysis (BMA): The real estate broker's opinion of the expected final net sale price, determined after acquisition of the property by the third-party company.
Broker's tour: A preset time and day when real estate sales agents can view listings by multiple brokerages in the market.
Buyer: The purchaser of a property.
Buyer agency: A real estate broker retained by the buyer who has a fiduciary duty to the buyer.
Buyer agent: The agent who shows the buyer's property, negotiates the contract or offer for the buyer, and works with the buyer to close the transaction.
Carrying costs: Cost incurred to maintain a property (taxes, interest, insurance, utilities, and so on).
Closing: The end of a transaction process where the deed is delivered, documents are signed, and funds are dispersed.
CLUE (Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange): The insurance industry's national database that assigns individuals a risk score. CLUE also has an electronic file of a properties insurance history. These files are accessible by insurance companies nationally. These files could impact the ability to sell property as they might contain information that a prospective buyer might find objectionable, and in some cases not even insurable.
Commission: The compensation paid to the listing brokerage by the seller for selling the property. A buyer may also be required to pay a commission to his or her agent.
Commission split: The percentage split of commission compen-sation between the real estate sales brokerage and the real estate sales agent or broker.
Competitive Market Analysis (CMA): The analysis used to provide market information to the seller and assist the real estate broker in securing the listing.
Condominium association: An association of all owners in a condominium.
Condominium budget: A financial forecast and report of a condominium association's expenses and savings.
Condominium by-laws: Rules passed by the condominium association used in administration of the condominium property.
Condominium declarations: A document that legally establishes a condominium.
Condominium right of first refusal: A person or an association that has the first opportunity to purchase condominium real estate when it becomes available or the right to meet any other offer.
Condominium rules and regulation: Rules of a condominium association by which owners agree to abide.
Contingency: A provision in a contract requiring certain acts to be completed before the contract is binding.
Continue to show: When a property is under contract with contingencies, but the seller requests that the property continue to be shown to prospective buyers until contingencies are released.
Contract for deed: A sales contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property but the seller holds title until the loan is paid. Also known as an installment sale contract.
Conventional mortgage: A type of mortgage that has certain limitations placed on it to meet secondary market guidelines. Mortgage companies, banks, and savings and loans underwrite conventional mortgages.
Cooperating commission: A commission offered to the buyer's agent brokerage for bringing a buyer to the selling brokerage's listing.
Cooperative (Co-op): Where the shareholders of the corporation are the inhabitants of the building. Each shareholder has the right to lease a specific unit. The difference between a co-op and a condo is in a co-op, one owns shares in a corporation; in a condo one owns the unit fee simple.
Counteroffer: The response to an offer or a bid by the seller or buyer after the original offer or bid.
Credit report: Includes all of the history for a borrower's credit accounts, outstanding debts, and payment timelines on past or current debts.
Credit score: A score assigned to a borrower's credit report based on information contained therein.
Curb appeal: The visual impact a property projects from the street.
Days on market: The number of days a property has been on the market.
Decree: A judgment of the court that sets out the agreements and rights of the parties.
Disclosures: Federal, state, county, and local requirements of disclosure that the seller provides and the buyer acknowledges.
Divorce: The legal separation of a husband and wife effected by a court decree that totally dissolves the marriage relationship.
DOM: Days on market.
Down payment: The amount of cash put toward a purchase by the borrower.
Drive-by: When a buyer or seller agent or broker drives by a property listing or potential listing.
Dual agent: A state-licensed individual who represents the seller and the buyer in a single transaction.
Earnest money deposit: The money given to the seller at the time the offer is made as a sign of the buyer's good faith.
Escrow account for real estate taxes and insurance: An account into which borrowers pay monthly prorations for real estate taxes and property insurance.
Exclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are excluded from the contract or offer to purchase.
Expired (listing): A property listing that has expired per the terms of the listing agreement.
Fax rider: A document that treats facsimile transmission as the same legal effect as the original document.
Feedback: The real estate sales agent and/or his or her client's reaction to a listing or property. Requested by the listing agent.
Fee simple: A form of property ownership where the owner has the right to use and dispose of property at will.
FHA (Federal Housing Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee by the FHA that a percentage of a loan will be underwritten by a mortgage company or banker.
Fixture: Personal property that has become part of the property through permanent attachment.
Flat fee: A predetermined amount of compensation received or paid for a specific service in a real estate transaction.
For sale by owner (FSBO): A property that is for sale by the owner of the property.
Gift letter: A letter to a lender stating that a gift of cash has been made to the buyer(s) and that the person gifting the cash to the buyer is not expecting the gift to be repaid. The exact wording of the gift letter should be requested of the lender.
Good faith estimate: Under the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, within three days of an application submission, lenders are required to provide in writing to potential borrowers a good faith estimate of closing costs.
Gross sale price: The sale price before any concessions.
Hazard insurance: Insurance that covers losses to real estate from damages that might affect its value.
Homeowner's insurance: Coverage that includes personal liability and theft insurance in addition to hazard insurance.
HUD/RESPA (Housing and Urban Development/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act): A document and statement that details all of the monies paid out and received at a real estate property closing.
Hybrid adjustable rate: Offers a fixed rate the first 5 years and then adjusts annually for the next 25 years.
IDX (Internet Data Exchange): Allows real estate brokers to advertise each other's listings posted to listing databases such as the multiple listing service.
Inclusions: Fixtures or personal property that are included in a contract or offer to purchase.
Independent contractor: A real estate sales agent who conducts real estate business through a broker. This agent does not receive salary or benefits from the broker.
Inspection rider: Rider to purchase agreement between third party relocation company and buyer of transferee's property stating that property is being sold "as is." All inspection reports conducted by the third party company are disclosed to the buyer and it is the buyer's duty to do his/her own inspections and tests.
Installment land contract: A contract in which the buyer takes possession of the property while the seller retains the title to the property until the loan is paid.
Interest rate float: The borrower decides to delay locking their interest rate on their loan. They can float their rate in expectation of the rate moving down. At the end of the float period they must lock a rate.
Interest rate lock: When the borrower and lender agree to lock a rate on loan. Can have terms and conditions attached to the lock.
List date: Actual date the property was listed with the current broker.
List price: The price of a property through a listing agreement.
Listing: Brokers written agreement to represent a seller and their property. Agents refer to their inventory of agreements with sellers as listings.
Listing agent: The real estate sales agent that is representing the sellers and their property, through a listing agreement.
Listing agreement: A document that establishes the real estate agent's agreement with the sellers to represent their property in the market.
Listing appointment: The time when a real estate sales agent meets with potential clients selling a property to secure a listing agreement.
Listing exclusion: A clause included in the listing agreement when the seller (transferee) lists his or her property with a broker.
Loan: An amount of money that is lent to a borrower who agrees to repay the amount plus interest.
Loan application: A document that buyers who are requesting a loan fill out and submit to their lender.
Loan closing costs: The costs a lender charges to close a borrower's loan. These costs vary from lender to lender and from market to market.
Loan commitment: A written document telling the borrowers that the mortgage company has agreed to lend them a specific amount of money at a specific interest rate for a specific period of time. The loan commitment may also contain conditions upon which the loan commitment is based.
Loan package: The group of mortgage documents that the borrower's lender sends to the closing or escrow.
Loan processor: An administrative individual who is assigned to check, verify, and assemble all of the documents and the buyer's funds and the borrower's loan for closing.
Loan underwriter: One who underwrites a loan for another. Some lenders have investors underwrite a buyer's loan.
Lockbox: A tool that allows secure storage of property keys on the premises for agent use. A combo uses a rotating dial to gain access with a combination; a Supra® (electronic lockbox or ELB) features a keypad.
Managing broker: A person licensed by the state as a broker who is also the broker of record for a real estate sales office. This person manages the daily operations of a real estate sales office.
Marketing period: The period of time in which the transferee may market his or her property (typically 45, 60, or 90 days), as directed by the third-party company's contract with the employer.
Mortgage banker: One who lends the bank's funds to borrowers and brings lenders and borrowers together.
Mortgage broker: A business that or an individual who unites lenders and borrowers and processes mortgage applications.
Mortgage loan servicing company: A company that collects monthly mortgage payments from borrowers.
Multiple listing service (MLS): A service that compiles available properties for sale by member brokers.
Multiple offers: More than one buyers broker present an offer on one property where the offers are negotiated at the same time.
National Association of REALTORS® (NAR): A national association comprised of real estate sales agents.
Net sales price: Gross sales price less concessions to the buyers.
Off market: A property listing that has been removed from the sale inventory in a market. A property can be temporarily or permanently off market.
Offer to purchase: When a buyer proposes certain terms and presents these terms to the seller.
Office tour/caravan: A walking or driving tour by a real estate sales office of listings represented by agents in the office. Usually held on a set day and time.
Parcel identification number (PIN): A taxing authority's tracking number for a property.
Pending: A real estate contract that has been accepted on a property but the transaction has not closed.
Personal assistant: A real estate sales agent administrative assistant.
Planned unit development (PUD): Mixed-use development that sets aside areas for residential use, commercial use, and public areas such as schools, parks, and so on.
Preapproval: A higher level of buyer/borrower prequalification required by a mortgage lender. Some preapprovals have conditions the borrower must meet.
Prepaid interest: Funds paid by the borrower at closing based on the number of days left in the month of closing.
Prepayment penalty: A fine imposed on the borrower by the lender when the loan is paid off before it comes due.
Prequalification: The mortgage company tells a buyer in advance of the formal mortgage application, how much money the borrower can afford to borrow. Some prequalifications have conditions that the borrower must meet.
Preview appointment: When a buyer's agent views a property alone to see if it meets his or her buyer's needs.
Pricing: When the potential seller's agent goes to the potential listing property to view it for marketing and pricing purposes.
Principal: The amount of money a buyer borrows.
Principal, interest, taxes, and insurance (PITI): The four parts that make up a borrower's monthly mortgage payment. Private mortgage insurance (PMI): A special insurance paid by a borrower in monthly installments, typically of loans of more than 80 percent of the value of the property.
Professional designation: Additional nonlicensed real estate education completed by a real estate professional.
Professional regulation: A state licensing authority that oversees and disciplines licensees.
Promissory note: A promise-to-pay document used with a contract or an offer to purchase.
R & I: Estimated and actual repair and improvement costs.
Real estate agent: An individual who is licensed by the state and who acts on behalf of his or her client, the buyer or seller. The real estate agent who does not have a broker's license must work for a licensed broker.
Real estate contract: A binding agreement between buyer and seller. It consists of an offer and an acceptance as well as consideration (i.e., money).
REALTOR®: A registered trademark of the National Association of REALTORS® that can be used only by its members.
Release deed: A written document stating that a seller or buyer has satisfied his or her obligation on a debt. This document is usually recorded.
Relist: Property that was listed with another broker but relisted with a current broker.
Rider: A separate document that is attached to a document in some way. This is done so that an entire document does not need to be rewritten.
Salaried agent: A real estate sales agent or broker who receives all or part of his or her compensation in real estate sales in the form of a salary.
Sale price: The price paid for a listing or property.
Seller (owner): The owner of a property who has signed a listing agreement or a potential listing agreement.
Showing: When a listing is shown to prospective buyers or the buyer's agent (preview).
Special assessment: A special and additional charge to a unit in a condominium or cooperative. Also a special real estate tax for improvements that benefit a property.
State Association of REALTORS®: An association of REALTORS® in a specific state.
Supra®: An electronic lockbox (ELB) that holds keys to a property. The user must have a Supra keypad to use the lockbox.
Temporarily off market (TOM): A listed property that is taken off the market due to illness, travel, needed repairs, and so on.
Temporary housing: Housing a transferee occupies until permanent housing is selected or becomes available.
Transaction: The real estate process from offer to closing or escrow.
Transaction management fee (TMF): A fee charged by listing brokers to the seller as part of the listing agreement.
Transaction sides: The two sides of a transaction, sellers and buyers. The term used to record the number of transactions in which a real estate sales agent or broker was involved during a specific period.
24-hour notice: Allowed by law, tenants must be informed of showing 24 hours before you arrive.
Under contract: A property that has an accepted real estate contract between seller and buyer.
VA (Veterans Administration) Loan Guarantee: A guarantee on a mortgage amount backed by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Virtual tour: An Internet web/cd-rom-based video presentation of a property.
VOW's (Virtual Office web sites): An Internet based real estate brokerage business model that works with real estate consumers in same way as a brick and mortar real estate brokerage.
W-2: The Internal Revenue form issued by employer to employee to reflect compensation and deductions to compensation.
W-9: The Internal Revenue form requesting taxpayer identification number and certification.
Walk-through: A showing before closing or escrow that permits the buyers one final tour of the property they are purchasing.
Will: A document by which a person disposes of his or her property after death.
Mark Nash's fourth real estate book, "1001 Tips for Buying and Selling a Home" (2005), and working as a real estate broker in Chicago are the foundation for his consumer-centric real estate perspective which has been featured on ABC-TV, CBS The Early Show, Bloomberg TV, CNN-TV, Chicago Sun Times & Tribune, Fidelity Investor’s Weekly, Dow Jones Market Watch, HGTVpro.com, MSNBC.com, The New York Times, Realty Times, Universal Press Syndicate and USA Today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_Nash
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Focus Marketing Messages by Segmenting Real Estate Clients

All of the real estate clients you attract share some common traits and characteristics. Upon closer inspection, you can also find that you can break the commonalities down even further into sub-categories they share. Assuming you work primarily with single women, for example, you can see two subsets of single women emerge-mothers buy homes in one area while women without children buy in a separate area town.
You can segment and sub-segment your clients as you see fit for your business, but the four primary client segments are:
· Lifestyle
· Demographics
· Location
· Behavior


Once you slide your clients into the categories where they fall, it is much easier to create marketing messages for each group.

Lifestyle
A final major client segment is the lifestyles category, which speaks to the values and attitudes of the clients. Religion, extracurricular activities and household makeup can all be a part of a lifestyle, attitude or values category. If you work primarily with families, your marketing message is going to be different than if you are targeting senior couples that do not have children in the home any more. The housing needs for these two groups tend to be completely different from one another.

Demographics
Demographic information about your clients includes information such as their age, ethnicity, race, household income, gender, education level or profession. If you are a real estate agent that specializes in luxury homebuyers, then your clients fall into a demographic segment. Within the household income segment, you can still identify sub-segments. These sub-segments may be drilled down to other demographic categories such as luxury homebuyers that are single or couples versus those that have children, or can even be separated by gender.

Location
Another client segment to consider is location. In real estate, this is your primary client segment because you generally work within a region or area of the state where you are licensed. You can even drill your location segments down into specific neighborhoods. Regional differences can occur with the types of homes clients buy, so it can change the marketing approach and messaging you use.

Behavior
Clients can also be defined by their buying habits or behaviors. You may separate your clients by how active they are in seeking a home. You can define a frequent shopper as one that looks at homes almost as soon as you send one that fits their needs. A mid-range client can be someone who looks at homes occasionally, but not on a consistent basis. An infrequent shopper only looked at one or so homes or only bought a home from you and then never worked with you again.
Segmenting your clients allows you to use marketing messages that keep the frequent shoppers engaged with messages meant for them, while trying to reengage those buyers who are not as tightly connected with you. Client segmentation is so important when it comes to your marketing messages because each group requires you to take a completely different approach, but with the same goal in mind, which is to get them to act.
So, review your client list to see what they share in common. Take it a step further and break the categories of clients you have down into sub-categories. Client segmentation allows you to craft marketing messages that are meaningful to your target market. In the end, client segmentation makes the difference as to whether or not your marketing message moves them into action.

Kristie Lorette McCauley is a marketing copy and content expert who works with Realtors and real estate agents who struggle to market their business effectively to attract the right clients on a consistent basis. Kristie's clients receive proven, effective and extremely specific step-by-step information on exactly what they need to do to attract clients with their marketing. As a result, those who work with Kristie attract more clients and make more money than that would have on their own. For more information, visit http://actionmarketingcopy.com/packages/real-estate-services/.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kristie_Lorette_McCauley
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7563017

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